Category Archives: Diver

Anstead Oceanis Banner

Anstead Oceanis – A second try at their premier watch

I have written about it here before, and I will say again, that I own an Anstead Oceanis. The original Anstead Oceanis, as sold on Kickstarter. It was my first really big (relatively) purchase on that site, my first crowd funded watch, and one of the reasons why I am currently on staff here at WWR; it stirred enough passion in me to offer to write a review, which led to more writing, which led to this gig. Now Tom Anstead, the man behind the watch, has relaunched it in a way, selling the Oceanis direct through his web site. But this version, still under the same name, and still “the first of the naval combat series,” is really an improvement and refinement over the original Oceanis, a watch I still enjoy and wear.

Haigh Hastings M2 Diver 01

Haigh & Hastings M2 Diver, Keep Calm and Carry On

I am one of those guys that wears a watch all the time. Well, almost all the time, when I am involved in one of my potentially dangerous activities, I don’t wear a watch. For me, this is road biking, mountain biking and rock climbing. It isn’t that I don’t want to know the time, it is that if I take a fall (and I have been known to crash my mountain bike a fair bit), I don’t want to damage my watch. But now, the Haigh & Hastings M2 Diver can ease that worry, pairing a nice looking, sensible diver with a 5-year damage repair guarantee.

Rolex Deep Sea Challenge

Historical Horology – Diving Into Dive Watches

I like dive watches. My first automatic, years ago, was an inexpensive (Freestyle I think) dive watch that I purchased because I started diving. For years, my daily watch was a Eco-Drive titanium dive watch. My first purchase on kickstarter (and the direct link to me writing for this site) was an Anstead dive watch. My first high end watch is likely going to be the Omega Seamaster in orange (one I run out of other things to spend $6,000 on). But let’s be honest, these are no longer tools for diving, rather they are fashion choices.

Lew Huey Orthos 01

Lew & Huey Orthos, Lets Go Diving

For a lot of guys, a diver is the default tool watch. The cases are usually fairly beefy, and that translates to masculine, the watches themselves are rugged, they serve a purpose, and they broadcast to the world that you are a man of action. So you might as well inject a little style into the watch as well. That is where the Lew & Huey Orthos comes in with their latest Kickstarter campaign. These ‘friends of the site’ have put their fifth model up for sale, and the first true diver of the bunch.

Orbital by element watch 02

Orbital by element watch, A Family Affair

There are a lot of kickstarter watch projects where the creator has a dream of designing a watch, and then connects with a manufacturer in China to produce the watch. Well, element watches adds a twist to that formula, in that the watch manufacturer back in China is owned by the designer’s father. The Orbital by element watch is the company’s second bite at the kickstarter apple, and in my opinion it is a more attractive watch than the (unsuccessful) first project.

Squale Tiger ToM 04

Squale Dive Watches on Touch of Modern

Touch of Modern, a web site that I like to browse and where we point readers from time to time is running a limited time sale of Swiss dive watches from Squale Watches. The watches range from the basic diver, the Atmos, to a vintage Tiger from the 70s/80s that has been rebuilt housing an ETA 2892 movement, new hands, new gaskets, and a new rubber strap.

Momentum Torpedo 2

Budget Watches Pick up Momentum

Today I want to point you two watch offerings from Momentum Watch Company, the Torpedo and the Steelix, that are what you might consider budget buys. Momentum makes a number of watches, including some diver offerings, which is where the Torpedo sits, which the Steelix is more of a Field watch. Both watches have a 44mm diameter brushed stainless steel case with the crown at 4:00. The watches contain a Japanese quartz movement, have anti-glare coated mineral crystals and are depth rated to 200 feet.