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Bovet: China’s Dream Watch

bovet-fleurier-no-2932.jpgBovet is all but unknown here but it’s quite popular in China. This is a fascinating piece, their version of a sports watch, which is pretty hot no matter what language you speak.

Made in 2001. Self-winding, water-resistant, asymmetric, diamond-set stainless steel gentleman’s wristwatch with Chinese Dial, square button chronograph at 11 and 1 o’clock, registers, date and a stainless steel Bovet deployant clasp. Three-body case, polished and brushed, screwed-down transparent case back, rounded polished band, brushed inclined bezel, asymmetric “Vendôme” type lugs with screwed bars at 6, extended mobile geometrical-shaped pendant and winding-crown at 12, square chronograph buttons at 11 and 1. Dial: Mother-of-pearl with blue enameled Chinese characters for the hours, subsidiary sunk dials for the seconds, 12-hour and 30-minute register dials with unusual numeration, double aperture for the date at 12 with Arabic numerals. Blued steel skeletonized “bâton” hands.

Bovet Fleurier Sportster

Watching the Web for November 21, 2015

web banner sizeThank you for taking the time out of your day and stopping by to check out our regular Saturday feature, Watching the Web, where we take a little bit of time to highlight interesting watch related articles and watch reviews we find on other sites across the web.  We then take a little time to promote our own popular articles from the last week or so.  Today, I wanted to point you to reviews of the Bovet Sergio Pinanfarina Split Second Chronograph 45, the URWERK EMC Pistol, and the Junghans Meister Pilot Event Edition.  From our site, the most popular posts over the last week or so have been the reviews of the Vejrhøj Nautic, the Manchester Watch Works Tatoskok, the Oris Divers Sixty-Five.

Bovet embraces the 365.25-day year, the Pope be damned

Most of the world is happy to accept the Gregorian calendar and the need for leap years—but the Bovet Récital 20 Astérium is having none of that. Since the Earth actually spins around the Sun once every 365 days, 6 hours, 9 minutes and 9.77 seconds (or 365.25 days) the calendar needs to catch up to the sky every four years, hence the leap year. A watch will require manual or mechanical adjustment to account for the extra day. In the case of an annual calendar, you reset the watch each February. A perpetual calendar will adjust for February’s shifting length through mechanical gymnastics every four years. But the Bovet Récital 20 Astérium dispenses with the pretense and simply counts time as it is—setting its annual calendar by the stars, not Pope Gregory XIII. The result is both simple and complex.