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Diefendorff brings Brooklyn cool to your wrist

Ayyy! Fugetaboutit! I got yer egg cream right here! In the hand that is wearing my Diefendorff watch, a new $949 timepiece from a real Brooklyn watch house.

The watch, which comes in multiple styles, shines brightest when comes with a carbon fiber face and brightly polished steel case. Called the 1776 Design, the watch is slightly reminiscent of a Patek Nautilus but without the odd case design.

Casio goes all-steel for their new G-Shocks

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The G-Shock is so nerdy that it’s become cool and this latest model, the GMWB5000GD-9, is no exception. Based on the original G-Shock models, this decidedly unsmart (but not dumb) watch features solar charging, atomic timekeeping, and a simple Bluetooth connection to your phone. Plus, now it comes in gold or silver toned metal, a decided departure for the decades-old brand.

Jaquet Droz goes slumming with a “Sports Watch”

Watchmaker Jaquet Droz makes luxury watches that cost more than some San Francisco apartments. Now, however, they’ve decided to go “downmarket” with their Sports Watch chronograph, a handmade watch that is designed for both work and play.

The watch is a standard chronograph with big date, a complication that displays the date as two digits instead of on a rotating dial. The resulting piece looks like a haute couture Speedmaster and should cost around $15,000, an acceptable sum for a manufacture watch with Droz’s provenance given that other Droz watches can run into the $100,000s, a price that might be less appetizing to the illiquid entrepreneur.

More from the release:

True to watchmaking tradition, the hour markers are 18-carat white gold appliques. Wide Roman numerals indicate 3, 6, 9 and 12 o’clock. At 12 o’clock, Jaquet Droz features a big date, a complication traditional in fine watchmaking but rarely associated with a chronograph. Although more complex to produce than a simple date aperture, the large date offers superior readability. Again, to provide optimal readability, the latest versions of the SW Chrono feature a 45 mm dial, and a rail track over the motion work in fine watchmaking tradition.

The strap is made of “rolled-edge hand-made dark-blue fabric,” a unique addition to the luxury watch world that has thus far used rubber or metal for bands. It is water resistant to 50 meters, if you think you’re going to get wet with this thing on your wrist, and it should be on sale before the end of the year.


The Tissot Seastar 1000 my new go-to entry level diver

In the pantheon of watches there are a few that stand out. Looking for your first automatic watch? Pick up a Seiko Orange Monster. Looking for a piece with a little history? The Omega Speedmaster is your man. Looking for an entry-level Swiss diver that won’t break the bank? Tissot’s Seastar has always had you covered.

The latest version of the Seastar is an interesting catch. A few years ago – circa 2010 – the pieces were all black with bold hands and a more staid case style. Now Tissot, a Swatch Group brand, has turned the Seastar into a chunkier diver with massive bar hands and case that looks like a steel sandwich.

The $695 Seastar 1000 contains a Powermatic 80/ETA C07.111 movement with an eighty hour power reserve which means the watch contains a massive mainspring that keeps things going for most of three days without winding. The Seastar is also water resistant to 1000 feet thanks to a huge screw down crown and thick casing. The new model has an exhibition back where you can see the rotor spinning over and balance wheel. The watch also has a ceramic bezel, a fairly top-of-the-line feature in an entry level watch.

Tissot has a long and interesting history. Best known for their high-tech T-Touch watches which had touchable crystals, allowing you to activate a compass, barometer, or altimeter with a single tap, the mechanical pieces have always seemed like an afterthought. The company also produces the classic Tissot Le Locle as well as a chronograph that I absolutely loved, the T-Navigator, but that has been discontinued. The Seastar, then, is one of the few mechanical pieces they sell and at sub-$1,000 prices you’re basically getting a Swiss watch with solid power reserve and great looks.

Watch folks I’ve talked to over the past few months see a distinct upturn in the Swiss watch market. Their belief that the Apple Watch is driving sales of mechanical watches seems to be coming true, even if it means cheaper fashion watches are being decimated. Tissot sits in that sweet spot between luxury and fashion, a spot that also contains Tag Heuer and Longines. Ultimately this is an entry level watch for the beginning collector but it’s a beautiful and beefy piece and worth a look.

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The Horological Machine 9 puts a rocket on your wrist

If you’ve been keeping up with watchmaker MB&F you’ll be familiar with their Horological Machine series, watches that are similar in construction but wildly differ when it comes to design. This watch, the HM9, is called the Flow and hearkens back to roadsters, jets, and 1950s space ships.


The watch, limited to a run of 33 pieces, shows the time on a small forward-facing face in one of the cones. The other two cones contain dual balance wheels. The balance wheel is what causes the watch to tick and controls the energy released by the main spring. Interestingly, MB&F added two to this watch in an effort to ensure accuracy. “The twin balance wheels of the HM9 engine feed two sets of chronometric data to a central differential for an averaged reading,” they wrote. “The balances are individually impulsed and spatially separated to ensure that they beat at their own independent cadences of 2.5Hz (18,000bph) each. This is important to ensure a meaningful average, just as how a statistically robust mathematical average should be derived from discrete points of information.”

There are two versions called the Road and Air and they cost a mere $182,000 (tax not included.) Considering nearly every piece of this is made by hand – from the case to the curved crystal to the intricate movement – you’re essentially paying a team of craftsman a yearly wage just to build your watch.

While it’s no Apple Watch, the MB&F HM9 is a unique and weird little timepiece. While it’s obviously not for everyone, with enough cash and a little luck you can easily join a fairly exclusive club of HM9 owners.

Introducing Watch On Your Wrist, our new deal club

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Over the past few months I’ve been thinking about how we can use the awesome reach and power of WristWatchReview for good and not evil. While we have thus far used our energies to create planet-busting space stations and hollowing out a volcano for our underground lair, I talked to the team and they said that they would prefer to give you great deals on watches we love. Thus Watch On Your Wrist was born.

We’ll be running a special deal on a watch, band, or brand and we’ll do a few reviews of the products we feature. I see it as a sort of service to you guys and a chance for small brands to showcase themselves on the site.

This month we’re bringing special deals on Traser, especially the P59 Essential M, a quartz piece with some amazing lume. Traser is famous for its trigalight gas tubes that turn a standard watch face into a lightshow and this piece looks beautiful in the light and in the dark.

I’ll be running a full review of the piece later this week but until then please check out Traser’s website and feel free to use the coupon code WWR42 to get 5% off any watch and free shipping. Happy hunting!

Hands-on with LIV’s beefy and bold chronograph for race lovers

LIV Watches is a crowdfunding darling with a number of Kickstarted watches under its belt. Now it’s offering a unique set of watches to backers, including the Liv Genesis GX-AC, an automatic chronograph with date. The watch runs a Sellita Caliber SW500, visible through the see-through back, and features a screw down crown and massive metal pushers.

The company prides itself on the size of its watches and this piece is no exception. The GX-AC isn’t wildly big – at 46mm it’s just a bit bigger than most Android Wear watches – and it fits nicely thanks to a rounded rubber band that hugs the top and bottom of the case. There is a small running seconds hand at nine-o’clock and registers for minutes and hours at noon and six.

If you’ve seen automatic chronographs before you know what you’re in for – a standard movement encased in a special steel case that is designed to appeal to a certain demographic. LIV is also Kickstarting a number of other watches, including a Day-Date chronograph that is flight-inspired and a diver, so check them out. However, if you’re into this piece then you’re in for a treat. It starts at $790, far below most mechanical chronographs I’ve seen, and the workmanship and quality of this piece is quite nice.

I wore it a little over the past few weeks and found it very comfortable and easy to read. The running seconds hand is a bit small and the lume is limited to the pips and hands but as a fashion/everyday wear piece it’s excellent. If you particularly like the style – F1 racing meets Kylo Ren – then you’re probably going to like this thing and since they’ve already surpassed their goal and hit $602,000 you can expect delivery of your perk.

Again, watches like this one require a specific style and taste. The LIV is reminiscent of Alpina and Tissot in its case style and decoration and it pays homage to racing and speed. Grabbing a Swiss made watch for under $1,000 is a treat and this is a good example of the species and well worth a look.

THE GX SWISS AUTO CHRONOGRAPH

  • Movement: Sellita SW 500 Swiss automatic chronograph
  • Power reserve: 48 hours
  • Number of jewels: 25
  • 12 hour chronograph functions: hours, minutes, seconds
  • Date displayed in window – quick set
  • Water resistance: 100 meters
  • Three-dimensional multilayered sandwich dial
  • Luminescence – BGW9 on hands and large indexes
  • Genuine sapphire crystal – scratch resistant and anti-reflective
  • Skeleton back
  • 316L stainless steel case
  • Screwed down case back with four screws
  • Screw in crown

 

 

Help support my new book, Nayzun

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As you can probably guess, I love to write and I wanted to share something cool I’ve been working on for the past two years – a new book in the Mytro trilogy called Nayzun.


This is the second book in the Mytro series and takes your favorite heroes from Brooklyn to Barcelona to Iceland to the edge of space. It’s a labor of love and I’m writing these books for kids who love travel, trains, and strange new places.

Written for young adults but fun for all ages, Nayzun is the story of a secret subway system, the kids who discover it, and the strange and dangerous group bent on taking control of it. It’s full of fun, adventure, and intrigue and I want you to be the first to have it. This is a new book and a continuation of the first Mytro book.

I could really use your help. I would love to share Nayzun with you all and I’ve made a special secret perk just for you watch lovers. This gets you both ebook copies of both Nayzun and Mytro for $5. You can click here to grab your perk.

I loved writing these books and thousands of kids have loved reading them. Please check it out.

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It’s time to make Citizen great again

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I want to talk about Citizen. Citizen has made a lot of impressive moves: they make Super Titanium, a hardened-surface treatment to titanium bracelets and cases, Eco-drive movements, and they bought Alpina and Frederique Constant. That’s not all bad. They also make the Miyota 82xx and 9015 movements, which are used in many of the micro-brand watches we review here. But Citizen has a problem, and it’s time to do something about it. Citizen’s own branded watches are boring, but it wasn’t always this way. It’s time to make Citizen great again.

I’m crowdfunding my next YA book, Nayzun

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As you can probably guess, I love to write and I wanted to share something cool I’ve been working on for the past two years – a new book in the Mytro trilogy called Nayzun.


This is the second book in the Mytro series and takes your favorite heroes from Brooklyn to Barcelona to Iceland to the edge of space. It’s a labor of love and I’m writing these books for kids who love travel, trains, and strange new places.

Written for young adults but fun for all ages, Nayzun is the story of a secret subway system, the kids who discover it, and the strange and dangerous group bent on taking control of it. It’s full of fun, adventure, and intrigue and I want you to be the first to have it. This is a new book and a continuation of the first Mytro book.

I could really use your help. I would love to share Nayzun with you all and I’ve made a special secret perk just for you watch lovers. This gets you both ebook copies of both Nayzun and Mytro for $5. You can click here to grab your perk.

I loved writing these books and thousands of kids have loved reading them. Please check it out.

[amazon_link asins=’B00K3O7BKA’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’wristwatchrev-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’b1f6b506-4da8-11e8-8b54-577baa6795db’]