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Home Watch Types Manual Page 6

Wooden Clock Kit

90682693_dfa1bf5167_m.jpgKrazyDad reviews a super cool wooden clock kit made of pressboard, dowels, and not much else. Very George Washington Carver.

Here are the components spread out. Most of the parts are laser cut plywood. There are also some dowels, screws, nylon washers and string. The kit comes with a detailed and helpful 43 page instruction manual, that is *much* better than the terse instructions that come with IKEA furniture. Jeff is very careful to navigate you through most of the potential “gotchas” that will occur during the construction process. I started working on the clock about 2 and a half weeks ago, working mostly on weekends. All in all, I’ve probably spent about 20 hours on it thus far.

The Ascent – A Wooden Clock Kit [KrazyDad]

Breaking in Mechanicals


WUS has a nice thread about breaking in mechanical watches – why don’t you just wear them? Fun advice.

To maintain accuracy it is not necessary that you wind up your watch on a regular basis if you don´t wear it day by day. But if you`re wearing your handwounded watch day by day it seems reasonable to wind it up daily, so that the tension of the spring is kinda constant which ist the best way to provide accuracy.
No problem with automatic watches though when wearing on a daily basis because the automatic winding “automatically” provides the “right” tension of the spring.

Breaking-in a Mechanical Watch?? [WatchUSeek]

Cabestan $220,000 Wristwatch

cabestan_watch.jpgThis looks like an exercise in “odd design” but I suppose there are a few interesting innovations here. This was made by the same bloke, Jean-François Ruchonnet, who created the TAG Heuer Monaco V4 Concept Watch. I’m not quite understanding this whole thing, but here’s a quick discussion:

Winding the watch and setting the hour and minutes are effected using a winding stem in the form of a movable “winch” that links directly to one of the small “capstans” that are found at the four exterior angles of the case: at the upper left, it acts directly on the fusee and, by the intermediary of the chain, allows the barrel to be wound; at the upper right, it acts on the minute cylinder which is connected to that of the hours. The two other small “capstans” are only there for decoration and to complete the aesthetics of the case. Once the small winch is used, it is easily stored in the buckle of the watch’s bracelet.

Complication for complication’s sake? You decide.

Operation Cabestan: When two independents come together to shake up the world of watches [EuropaStar]

Patek Ref. 5099/101RG

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Holy crap.

Pièce Unique for the “only watch 2005” charity auction. “Cabriolet” wristwatch in rose and white gold; manually wound caliber 215 PS movement with subsidiary seconds. The two-tone silvery dial features rose gold baton indexes and two applied Breguet-style numerals at 12 o’clock. The subsidiary seconds dial at 6 o’clock emulates the square shape of the case.

Check it out here.

Patek Philippe 5970 – Worthless

Patek screws up. Big time.

What? What’s the problem? Well, you simply cannot rapidly and accurately read the stopwatch time between 27 and 33 seconds as the calender cuts in to the stopwatch scale. 0/10 for function Patek. Sorry, but it’s just not acceptable to make GLARING FUNCTIONAL ERRORS on watches this expensive. However, it is becoming more and more common through the industry. I can quote other examples but why bother? Nobody seems interested. These type of watches remain sales successes with the general public and get worshipped even by the cognoscenti. Here’s the 5970 and question is, what’s the stopwatch time?

Patek Philippe 5970 – Pasta Timer or True Chronograph? [Velociphile’s Journey into Watches]