Home Reviews In Review: Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph

In Review: Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph

285
0

Long-time readers of WWR by now know that I’m probably the most chronograph-averse person on the team here. While I appreciate the sheer mechanical wizardry that goes into the movement, it’s something that I just simply do not have a good use case for in my day-to-day life (much in the same way I’m not much for smart watches past workout tracking). Even so, Tutima keeps working on me, and I recently got to spend some time with the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph.

And you know what? I think they are working on me, as this is the third chrono I’ve had in from them. I first looked at the Tutima M2 Pioneer Chronograph and then the Tutima Saxon One. Those have had some rather distinctive styles, and now the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph introduces another – one that seems to be an almost stereotyped approach to Germanic starkness on the dial. And sure, it’s an aesthetic, but it’s also supremely legible and usable. Function over form, and all that.

Which is not to say form is lost. Rather, the form of the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph is what had me agreeing to bring the loaner in. For one, the titanium case gives you the look of a integrated bracelet without actually going fully into the look – sort of a half-step for those unsure. Next – and most importantly – is how practically flush the chronograph pushers are on the side of the case. Here, they’re blending into the lines that the crown guard create, and lets them slide into the background. While they’re thin when viewed from on top, they’re actually plenty large on the sides, and have a nice grippy texture on them. In other words, it’s the best of both worlds – pushers that won’t get caught on things, and are still about the easiest to use (and engage the movement) that I’ve run into.

It also didn’t hurt that loaner we were offered of the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph came in blue, my numero uno hue. The dial is mostly matte, while the chapter ring and the sub-dials get a slightly darker and glossier hur. The leather strap (which is rubber-backed) brings a third shade into the mix, and it all sets up nicely against the grey of the titanium (on the case) and steel (on the clasp).

So, the looks are there, and once I had it adjusted, it was time to wear the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph a bit. While the titanium no doubt helps keep the weight down, the large case definitely wants to sit very proudly on your wrist. That’s partly due to the room necessary when you’ve got an automatic rotor and the chronograph complications, and partly due to how the semi-integrated strap has stiffer ends at the shoulder, so things extend out from the case before it drops to your wrist. This creates a cleaner look when viewing the watch on top, but will definitely lead to an odd fit on smaller wrists. Once on, though, I quickly got used to it, and had no problems with using it around the house.

All said, though, as I’m not much for timing things on my wrist, something like the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph is, frankly, overkill for what I look for out of a watch. While it’s a lovely piece in it’s own right, and I’m down with the overall look and style, it’s still not the “one” that converts me over to the chronograph camp.

If you’re not as stuck on that as I am, though, I’d say you’ll no doubt be happy with the Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph. At this time, it does not appear you can purchase Tutima M2 Coastline Chronograph directly from the brand; when you locate your local retailer, you’ll be able to get your own for $3,300. This is a watch that, while definitely Teutonic in it’s overall look, has Tutima taking things in their own distinct direction. tutima.com

Tech Specs from Tutima

  • Ref: M2 Coastline Chronograph 6430-06
  • Movement: Cal. Tutima 310
  • Case: Solid brushed titanium
  • Dial: blue
  • Band: Rubber-/leather strap with folding clasp
  • Diameter: 43 mm
  • Height: 15.8 mm
  • Movement details: Automatic movement. Rotor with gold seal. 25 jewels. Polished screws. Power reserve when fully wound 48 hours.
  • Functions: Date display. Hour, minute, small second. Chronograph 60-second counter, 30-minute counter and 12-hour counter.
  • Dial details: SuperLumiNova-coated indices
  • Case details: Pressure-tested to 20 bar. Sapphire crystal anti-reflective. Screw-in case back. Screw-in crown. Integrated push-buttons with black PVD.

Thank you for reading this WristWatchReview post. With so many things competing for everyone’s attention these days, we really appreciate you giving us your time. We work hard every day to put quality content out there for our community.

WristWatchReview is one of the few remaining truly independent watch news outlets. We do not have a giant corporation behind us, and we rely heavily on our community to support us, in an age when advertisers are increasingly uninterested in sponsoring small, independent watch sites — especially a site like ours that is unwilling to pull punches in its reporting and analysis. We don't play the games the other sites play and we've paid for it when it comes to ad revenue.

We would love for you to support us on Patreon and every little bit helps. Thank you.

–The WWR Team

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.