Home Brands Timex Introducing the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic in Blue

Introducing the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic in Blue

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While I can’t say I was watching Timex that closely when the S1 Automatic was first released in November 2019, it’s no surprise at all to me that it sold out. It’s a lovely-looking watch, full stop. Well, now they’re back – not just with more of the original silver dial, but also a new midnight blue version of the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic.

Giorgio Galli

First things first – who is Giorgio Galli? A designer with 20 years of watch designs under his belt, starting with the Swatch group and winding up head of his own design studio, which was purchased by Timex in 2007. That means he’s the creative head of this studio within Timex, and looking to create lovely new designs for us.

For me, the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic represents a very modern aesthetic meshed up with vintage looks. This – again, to my eye – is done with subtle tweaks. First off, the indices on the dial are a deal longer than you’d expect for a vintage-look watch. The handset, those give you a partially skeletonized look, whereas true vintage would have a completely solid hand (lumed or not, could go either way). The case, at 41mm, is larger than most any vintage piece you’d find, and looks to be mostly brushed rather than fully polished.

And finally, there’s a detail on the dial of the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic that I really, really like. See that small red dot at the 6 o’clock position? That’s actually a movement jewel there, subtly telling you that, yes, this is indeed an automatic watch (sort of like how Rado will have the spinning anchor to do the same). A great way of communicating information without resorting to a ton of text on the dial.

That movement is the Miyota 9039. Perhaps not the most exciting movement of all time, but who cares – so long as it gets the job done, it’s something you’ll likely not care about in the day to day. Sure, when you look at the custom rotor through the caseback of the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic, you may. But in general? If it keeps accurate time, you’ll forget about what’s in there.

With a watch design like this, we’d usually expect the strap to be a simple leather affair, yeah? Well, Galli has one more modernization trick up his sleeve. Here, the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic comes on a synthetic rubber strap with a “rivet keeper” at the end that looks like something you’d expect more from a band on a fitness watch.

Of course, if that’s just a step too far for you, you could easily pop a more standard leather strap into the lugs of the Timex Giorgio Galli S1 Automatic, and away you go. Both the new blue dial, and the original silver version, can be had for $450 directly from Timex. Well, at least as long as they stay in stock (which history has shown may go quicker than you might expect). timex.com

Tech Specs from Timex

  • Case
    • Skeleton 41 mm Metal Injected Molded (MIM) Stainless Steel 316 L
    • Exhibition case back
    • Water resistance: 50 Meters
  • Glass
    • Double curved K1 Mineral Glass
    • Double side antiglare treatment
  • Dial
    • Skeleton curved dial with applied indexes Applied Sapphire stone
  • Automatic Movement
    • Caliber
      • Miyota 9039
      • 11 1/2 ligne (25.4 mm)
      • Twenty Four (24) Jewels
      • Vibration frequency 4Hz or 28.8k vph Hacking seconds
    • Accuracy: -10/+30 seconds per day
    • Power reserve: 42 hours
    • Full wind: 40 full turns of crown
    • Rotor: Exclusive custom design
  • Strap
    • NBR, High durability synthetic rubber Quick-release custom made spring bar Rivet keeper (Registered design)
    • Buckle: Solid SST 316 L

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