Home Under $500 The Maranez Layan, Set In Stone

The Maranez Layan, Set In Stone

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Layan Ocean Prolute.jpg.opt426x462o0,0s426x462

Today, I want to talk to you about a watch that I first really took notice of due to seeing it on Instagram. Prior to seeing the post, I had been aware of the watch, but the dial really caught my eye. The watch in question, with it’s stone dial, was the Maranez Layan.

At first glance, you might be tempted to dismiss the Maranez Layan as another copycat sort of a watch. Which, to be fair, we do see plenty of cushion cases (which I happen to like) and California dials showing up. You might even think, oh, another bronze case. Which, in this case, would actually be incorrect, as the Layan relies on brass for its 43mm case.

Layan Gold Obsidian.jpg.opt426x459o0,0s426x459

Of course, brass can and will develop a patina over time like bronze does. Fortunately, the caseback is made of stainless steel (as is the crown, under its brass cover), so you should not end up with green marks on your wrist. It is also a pleasant surprise to see a sapphire crystal topping the 300m Layan, given the price point the watches are available at (more on that in a bit).

Under the dial with its SuperLuminova markers, we have a Seiko NH35 automatic movement keeping things running – nothing that will set the movement aficionados on fire, but it should be a sturdy daily workhorse. Now, the dial itself, that is a different story.

You could opt for a standard sort of a dial, in either brown, black, green, blue, or red, and either with the California dial or Arabic numerals. Those are nice enough, but what really sets the watches apart are the stone dials that they have. The one that caught my eye on Instagram had a blue dial to it, which it unfortunately looks like they no longer have.

Layan Tiger Eye.jpg.opt426x462o0,0s426x462

At the time of this writing, they did have some other lovely options, including malachite, jasper, and ocean prolute. The use of stone like this not only provides a styling difference – it provides a very natural, earthy feel to the watch. Surprisingly, these dials do not really raise the price all that much.

The standard Maranez Layan is available at a reasonable $299 (which includes shipping); opting for one of the stone dials (which are in limited numbers) only brings the price up to $319. We have seen watches that feature marble in the dial (and bracelets), and those are nice, presenting a dressier look and feel. With the Maranez Layan, you are getting a more casual approach, with an everyday sort of watch that allows you to carry a little bit of geology right on your wrist. maranez.com

Watch Overview

  • Brand & Model: Maranez Layan
  • Price: $299 (standard dial), $319 (stone dial)
  • Who we think it might be for: You’ve been looking for a cushion case diver from a micro brand that can subtly stand out on your wrist
  • Would I buy one for myself based on what I’ve seen?: If the blue dial that I saw on Instagram was still in stock, it would be seriously tempting.
  • If I could make one design suggestion, it would be: Something owners could do – apply a good polishing to the watch. With the stone dial, some polished surfaces could really set things off nicely.
  • What spoke to me the most about this watch: The stone dial option. If it was not for those, I probably would not have given the Maranez Layan a second look.

Tech Specs from Maranez

  • Movement: Seiko NH35 automatic
  • Case: 43mm wide excluding the crown – lug tip to lug tip 53mm – height 14mm – weight on leather strap 135g
  • Case material: Brushed Brass
  • Case back: Screw down stainless steel with individual serial number
  • Crown: Screw down stainless steel with brass cover 8mm with 3 gaskets
  • Crystal: Sapphire (single domed), inner AR coating
  • Dial: Markers with Super Luminova C3
  • Water-resistance: 300m/1000ft
  • Strap: 24mm – 3 different straps – leather, rubber and nato
  • Buckle: Brass on each strap

 

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3 COMMENTS

  1. Aha looks like my blue one really caught your attention! I’m glad you liked it. Great review!!!
    Cheers!
    Pedro (IG: paguiarneto)

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