Home Reviews REVIEW: Swiss Eagle Flight Deck (Part 2)

REVIEW: Swiss Eagle Flight Deck (Part 2)

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Yesterday, we started our review of the  Swiss Eagle, taking a look at some of the design elements, as well as the chronograph functionality.   Today, we’ll wrap things up by having a look at the experience in daily wear, and the remaining specs.

The stainless steel case measures in at a comfortable 44mm, with nicely curved lugs allowing it to snug up on your wrist.  The alternating matte/polished bracelet comes in at 22mm wide, and I had no issues with comfort.  As an additional nicety, the butterfly clasp has a push button release (as well as a flip lock), which makes it much easier to remove than a friction release would.

One note on the bracelet as it relates to sizing.  While I was able to size it in relatively close to what I like on my wrist (7.25″), it was still a touch looser than I would like.  I played with various link addition (and removal) along with setting the spring pin on the clasp, and either got it too tight or just a touch too loose.  If your wrist is more on the 0.5″ measurements, you shouldn’t have any issue.  For those of us on the quarters, though, it might be handy if some half-links were added to the bracelet in a future revision.

Rounding the remainder of the watch out, you’ve got a sapphire crystal up front, stainless steel screw-in case back, and a water resistance rating of 100m.  As with the other Swiss Eagle models we’ve reviewed, you’ve got some nicely applied lume (as well as the lumed logo applique, which I still think is a nice twist).

Minor design change wishes aside, this is a very solid quartz chronograph.  Should you not like the stainless and black model we reviewed, they do have three other iterations (stainless + white, IP black + black, and blue on black leather) available; pricing ranges from $310 up to $440, dependent on the specific model.

As to the pricing, yes, that is putting this one closer to the ranges you can get a nice automatic.  I think this particular model is again best suited for someone who wants the ease-of-use that a quartz model offers, and appreciates classic styling updated with some nice visual twists.

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