Home Continuing Series Watch Video Rewind Watch Video Rewind for September 11, 2016

Watch Video Rewind for September 11, 2016

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Thank you for popping in to visit with us and read this late edition of the Watch Video Rewind.  I was having trouble with the site last night, hence the late posting.  Yesterday I was chatting with some friends who were amused by the fact that I blog about watches.  One of them asked what watch I would want if I had limitless cash.  He did say I had to pick one watch, but I will toss out a few that will get into contention.  All the watches have been produced in the last few years, so you won’t see Marie Antoinette’s Watch here.

So let me start with the MB&F Legacy Machine Perpetual.  One of the things that I love about high-end mechanical watches is that they are essentially kinetic machines that use gears and springs to track repetitive events, the time of day.  Then you can layer in modules to track the day of the week and the date.  For most watches, there is the I second cycle, then the 1 minute cycle, then the 1 hour cycle, the 12 hours, Then 1 day, and then 31 days.  But perpetual watches know if you have 28, 30 or 31 days in a month, so it takes a lot of engineering to get some tiny gears to track this far more complicated cycle.  Plus, it is a really lovely watch.

The Christopher Claret DualTow Night Eagle is a watch that takes the mechanical movement but translates that movement in a different direction, running a pair of belts to tell the time.  It is cool, different, and an amazing little machine you get to watch work right in front of you.

But what about the movement of the planets I hear you asking.  Well, these are as regular as clockwork, so a clock can mimic their movements.  Mechanical planetariums have been around for ages, but Van Cleef & Arpels took one and shrunk it to wrist size, with the Poetique Midnight Planetarium Watch.

Lastly, I would love the Ressence Type 3.  It does not have the same view of the underlying mechanical movement, but it is a striking watch on the wrist, where the hands and sub dial seem to merge together and with the crystal to form a seemless look.  It is also the least expensive of the bunch, costing less that what I would pay in sales tax on the DualTow.

And with that, I’ll wrap up this week’s edition of Watch Video Rewind.  If you stumble across any interesting watch (or time) related videos out there, or if you make your own Watch Story, drop us a line. If we end up using in the watch video rewind from your suggestion, we’ll be sure to tip our hats (electronically, if not literally) in your general direction.

 

 

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