Home Watch Types Chronograph Introducing the Marloe Atlantic

Introducing the Marloe Atlantic

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It’s been some time since we’ve had Marloe Watch Co on our pages, but with our eyes turned away, they’ve managed to keep busy. Frankly, any brand launching new watches in the midst of pandemic disruptions is worth some applause. For those who like mechanical chronographs, the new Marloe Atlantic lineup may require a standing ovation.

At the heart of the Marloe Atlantic – quite literally – is the Seiko NE88a automatic mechanical movement. You know when we see Seiko, it’s going to hit that sweet spot of reliability, serviceability, and affordability. This also means that, for this watch, we get the classic two sub-dial look, which is oh-so-pleasingly balanced.

Inspiration for the Marloe Atlantic lineup starts with the R34, drawing direct inspiration from the R34 Airship, originally launched from an airfield in Scotland and becoming the first aircraft to complete a double trans-Atlantic crossing without incident. Now, that’s the sort of reliability you want to be inspired by, no?

That’s not all there is the Marloe Atlantic. For this launch, there are actually four different variants (all priced at $1,150) with different names to them, and different inspirations:

R34 

Over the years of design and development, the blueprint for the Atlantic chronoscope was based upon the design of the R34. This model takes direct inspiration from its namesake airship, with a quilted dial echoing the deep blue/green hue of the airship?s envelope. Contrasting sub-dials and an outer perimeter of silvery-white offer clarity and separation of purpose.?

Fortune?

East Fortune Airfield, the launchpad for the R34?s journey across the Atlantic, is now a racetrack. As a result, the Fortune model boasts race car colours, with a palate of black and white with red accents. The sporty ?Panda? dial is simple and clean, with a silvery-white face, applied 12 index and name plate, and raised outer chapter ring.?

Flyer

The Flyer is based on the traditional ?Flieger? style aviation watch ? bold, stark and simple. The design incorporates the traditional aspects of this aviation style with elements from the R34 airship?s altimeter. It features tangential 4-8 numbers, white-on-black colouring as well as glowing markings by way of Superluminova C3 luminescent paint.?

Spirit?

The Spirit again takes on the traditional ?Flieger? style, but applies a raw, aluminium aesthetic. This colourway takes inspiration from the steel and silvery fabric of Charles Lindbergh?s Spirit of St. Louis aircraft that completed the first ever solo crossing of the Atlantic in 1927. The radial sunburst pattern of the Spirit?s dial is contrasted by gunmetal hands and white sub-dials.?

All of the Marloe Atlantic models are available for pre-order now directly from the brand. Pricing is a reasonable (for a mechanical chronograph) $1,150, with colorways that are sure to find a home on many a wrist. In the meantime, we’re in talks with the brand to get a loaner in, so we can see it in person – and see if that strap is as comfortable in person as it looks in the photos. marloewatchcompany.com

Tech Specs from Marloe

  • 43mm diameter, 15mm width?
  • 22mm lugs?
  • Polished & brushed bespoke case?
  • Sapphire crystal with anti-reflective coating?
  • Multi-layer textured dial?
  • Aero-sword profile hands?
  • BGW9 Superluminova (Flyer only)?
  • Quickset date complication?
  • 117.3g?
  • 100m / 330ft water resistance?
  • Movement spec?
    • Seiko NE88a automatic mechanical movement?
    • 28,800 bph?
    • 34 jewels?
    • Automatic (with handwinding capability)?
    • 45+ hour power reserve?
    • -15 ~ + 25 sec/day?
    • Japanese Made?
    • Hours, minutes, sweep second, 60-second / 12-hour Chronoscope, hacking function, Diashock anti-shock, column wheel and vertical clutch?

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