The last time we were talking to you about the Tutima M2 Seven Seas (which you can see here), we were covering the new dial colors that had been released. While it’s been about a year since that release, the dials are still indeed available, and we were recently able to have a loaner in of this titanium-encased Kürbis.

For those wondering, Kürbis is the German word for pumpkin. While it may be summertime, we all know fall is just around the corner, and this watch put me in mind of that delicious pie-filling gourd. Or you may see it as folks head off into the woods for hunting. Whatever the scenario, deliciousness is going to happen, and the Tutima M2 Seven Seas is going to be happy to be along for the ride.

Though the Tutima M2 Seven Seas measures in at 44mm, it definitely does not weigh down the wrist with both the case and bracelet made of titanium. Here, it’s done up in a pearl-blasted finish, which gives it a subtle luster that tidily hides any fingerprints you might be getting on the metal. As long as we’re talking dimensions, let’s talk the thickness. At 13mm, this is perfectly reasonable for a dive watch. However, when you consider it’s one that’s been tested (and rated) to a 500m WR rating, that’s quite a feat in engineering (usually, we’d expect something at least 2-3mm thicker).

Material aside, the dial of the Tutima M2 Seven Seas is what’s going to attract the most attention. The signal orange is definitely eye catching, and is a fresh update to a dial that is very recognizable as being part of the M2 Seven Seas line. With the fully painted hands and rectangular indices, legibility is foremost on the watch, daytime or nighttime. Text on the dial is kept to a minimum, allowing the eye to quickly get the time or read the day-date windows. Speaking of those, these are done in white-on-black, allowing them to sink into the background a bit, much like the black seconds-hand does.

Another facet of the Tutima M2 Seven Seas that I really liked was how they did the bracelet attachment. The case is basically a lugless design, so that makes things a little tricky when it comes to affixing things. So, for this, there’s a solid endlink that is attached at the shoulders, and gets the bracelet angling down from the case. Then, of course, the main links of the bracelet attach to that, going on down to the crisp, signed deployant clasp.

You might think that a 500m dive watch really isn’t something that you’d want for daily wear, but the Tutima M2 Seven Seas would argue (and argue quite well) against that presumption. For one, it is quite light with the titanium. Along with the thinner profile, it has a very smooth and level top surface (across the sapphire crystal and the titanium dive bezel) meaning that it slips under a cuff easily. And given that it provides all the basic information you’d need in the day (time, day, date), we’d argue that yes, this would be an excellent choice for a daily watch.

If you’d like to pick up a Tutima M2 Seven Seas, you’re looking at $2,300. Oh, and should that bright orange dial not do it for you, it’s also available in a yellow (also quite bright) or black dial. And if bracelets aren’t your thing, you can also get a rubber/kevlar strap to hold it on your wrist. Check it out over at tutima.com

Tech Specs from Tutima

  • Ref: 6151-08
  • Movement: Cal. Tutima 300
    • Automatic movement
    • Rotor with gold seal
    • 25 jewels
    • Polished screws
    • Power reserve when fully wound 38 hours
  • Case: solid pearl-blasted titanium
    • Pressure-tested to 50 bar
    • Unidirectionally rotatable bezel with calibrations and luminous marking point coated with SuperLumiNova
    • Sapphire crystal anti-reflective
    • Screw-in crown
    • Screw-in case back.
  • Dial: signal orange; SuperLumiNova-coated indices
  • Band: solid titanium bracelet with folding clasp
  • Diameter: 44mm
  • Height: 13mm
  • WR: 50 ATM (500m)
  • Functions: Date display. Hour, minute, sweep second, day of week.

By Patrick Kansa

A big data developer and leader with a penchant for gadgets, books, watches and beverages. You can find my work on WristWatchReview, Knapsack.News, and Slushpile. If you're on Twitter and/or Instagram, you'll find me there as @PatrickWatches.

Leave a Reply